12 Kubernetes distributions to think about

Really good and simple article over on InfoWorld that describes 12 of the most popular Kubernetes distributions: click here.

  1. CoreOS Tectonic
  2. Canonical Distribution of Kubernetes
  3. Docker Community Edition / Docker Enterprise
  4. Heptio Kubernetes Subscription
  5. Mesosphere DC/OS
  6. Mirantis Cloud Platform
  7. Platform9 Managed Kubernetes
  8. Rancher 2.0
  9. Red Hat OpenShift
  10. Stackube
  11. SUSE Cloud as a Service Platform
  12. Telekube
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Open Social Containers to play with today

If you follow the Open Social community you will see there are many sites out there that use the Open Social API’s and are containers for Open Social Gadgets.  There are even sites dedicated to developers so you can start coding and playing around with the technology.  iGoogle is probably the most popular container but there are also many others you may want to check out.

You can start with the version 0.9 Tutorial and then check out the IDE for creating Open Social Gadgets.

Managed Browser, Landmarks, and XPath

In a recent article posted by Chuck, article here, he writes about how the DataChange events happen in the Managed Browser container.  The event is very powerful and allows for actions to be called when a DOM node changes.  I described similar use cases in an article where we constructed a web browser component using XPath.  In that article we show how the managed browser component can use XPath’s to DOM elements so we can extract data out of the current web page at a given URL (the landmark).  In the end, we took the information from one web page and inserted (wired) it into another web page that hosts a basic form.  This uses the dynamic wiring and the property broker message queue to transport the data from one browser to another.  With the combination of XPath’s and Landmarks (regular expression based URL’s), you can create some pretty complex components for large web applications.  Also remember, you can define landmarks that can overlap.  So in short, if your landmark expression (regular expression) is viable for the current page the events and actions will execute – so having many landmark expressions that overlap is actually common.

All of the containers that ship with the product support these landmark concepts and you can even create your own containers based on the public API’s.  Mike Cooper outlines the steps for creating your own container in a wiki article – Creating a Composite Application Container.  He focuses on using Eclipse/SWT for the UI but as you can see from the other container types you can pretty much use any kind of UI technology with this generic framework.

Recording available for the OpenSpan and IBM Lotus webinar from earlier this week.

This really is an impressive video, if you get the chance check it out.

Duration is 39 minutes.

In this 45-minute presentation, IBM and OpenSpan will explain the Lotus Windows Container strategy, which maximizes the ROI associated with implementing or migrating to Notes 8.5 or Expeditor 6.2. The OpenSpan Windows Container and the OpenSpan Scripting Container extend the value of Lotus Notes and Expeditor solutions by enabling the rapid integration of a broad range of Windows applications into comprehensive business workflow solutions using point and click technology. During the presentation, we will demonstrate composite solutions which incorporate a mix of Windows, Web-based and Mainframe applications integrated with other Lotus plug-ins and components.

You can check out the video recording here.

Eclipse, extensions, composites and XPages!

The attention this post by Anthony Holmes and the awesome 3D viewer Hiro wrote are getting is great!  I do think the Notes community is starting to see the benefit of Eclipse and more and more extensions are being done every day for the Notes 8.x clients.  That is a

I just completed the first draft of labs I will be directing at the Deutsche Notes User Group (DNUG) hosted by SIT GmbH.  I wrote about it last month in this entry.  I will start with a couple of introductory presentations about Composite Applications, Containers, and Eclipse and then follow up with the AD202 presentation Mike Cooper and I gave at Lotusphere 2010.  Interestingly with the talk of Vulcan, web and web 2.0 technologies the composite in this lab is a good combination of client side Java, Web applications, and local XPage components.  The composite links them all together for an interesting use case.

The labs turned out to be pretty in-depth and are designed to be 100% self paced – so I am not sure if I am even needed!  I would like to open this series of labs up for some re-use in other Notes user group meetings or Lotusphere Comes To You events so let me know if you run or host any of these events and we can get you the materials.

At this time I don’t think the material will be made publicly available so your best bet is getting with the nearest user group in your area.

To give you an idea of the breadth of things covered in this workshop I have included the full outline of the main labs:

Introduction …………………………………………………………… 3
What will you learn in this workshop? …………………………….. 4
What skills are needed in this workshop? …………………………. 4
What software is needed for this workshop? ……………………… 4
Configuring the Lotus Expeditor Toolkit ………………………….. 4
Lab 1 – Creating our custom action …………………………… 5
Step 1 – Creating the Eclipse project ………………………………….. 5
Step 2 – Creating the Eclipse Feature project …………………………………. 7
Step 3 – Creating the Eclipse Update Site ……………………………………….. 9
Step 4 – Setting up the custom action extension ………………………………….. 11
Step 5 – Programming our custom action …………………………………………… 15
Step 6 – Creating the custom UI for our action preference …………………….. 17
Step 7 – Compiling our projects ………………………………………………… 17
Step 8 – Installing the code into the Lotus Notes client ………………………. 18
Summary …………………………………………………………………………….. 23
Lab 2 – Creating our Calendar Helper XPage component ………….. 24
Step 1 – Creating the NSF and our new XPage ……………………………. 24
Step 2 – Creating our XPage ……………………………………………….. 25
Step 3 – Creating the Component Definition …………………………………….. 26
Step 4 – Coding the component event ………………………………. 28
Step 5 – Adding the ADD TO CALENDAR button ……………………….. 29
Step 6 – Conditionally enabling the button …………………………………… 30
Step 7 – Finishing the ProcessICal event ……………………………………………. 31
Step 8 – Creating the XPage labels ………………………………………………….. 33
Step 9 – Coding the ADD TO CALENDAR button …………………………………. 34
Summary ……………………………………………………………………………… 36
Lab 3 – Assembling the Composite Application ………………… 37
Step 1 – Creating the composite xml ……………………………………. 37
Step 2 – Making your composite application launch by default …………….. 38
Step 3 – Launching the composite into the CAE ………………….. 40
Step 4 – Changing the title of the page and application …………….. 41
Step 4 – Adding our XPage component to the palette ……………………. 43
Step 5 – Adding our Calendar Helper to the Right Sidebar ……………….. 46
Step 6 – Add a Managed Browser component to the main page area ……. 47
Step 7 – Configuring the browser component …………………………. 48
Step 8 – Wiring the two components together ……………………………. 51
Summary ……………………………………………………………. 52
Lab 4 – Embedding the Eclipse update site into our NSF ………….. 53
Step 1 – Changing the design of the database to inherit NSF Update Site ………… 53
Step 2 – Recompiling and importing the Eclipse update site ……………….. 56
Step 3 – Importing the update site into our NSF …………………… 57
Step 4 – Modify the database to open the composite …………………… 58
Step 5 – Linking the features to a component for installation …….. 60
Step 6 – Un-installing and testing your composite application ……………… 61
Summary ………………………………………………………………………. 63

New tutorial: Creating state in a custom action

When using the container framework and extending the containers with Java actions you can do some pretty interesting things.  One common request has been for how to create memory state within your action.  Since the action can be re-used across many instances of a component (many Eclipse view parts), if the action wants to save state per instance, it needs to account for that.  The tutorial uses the secondary identifier of the view part (where in composite applications is unique) to store the state in a map.  The tutorial uses MLB.com as a sample to pull information from the web pages and then store the values in our property map.  The custom action then prints the “state” for the properties.

Here is a link to the tutorial.

Introduction to custom actions and a new OpenNTF project

Lotus Notes 8.5.1 offers a wide range of extensibility and one of the new exciting features is custom actions.  This is an easy way to add function to any container type with basic Java.  We have just published a new article on the CA Wiki (Introduction to custom actions) that does a pretty in depth walk through of what custom actions are and how you can use them to add functionality to any of the containers (Web browser, Notes View, Notes Document, Symphony, HOD, etc).  Unlike the other tutorials that showed you how to implement different custom actions for specific containers, this one is more general and explains the overall architecture.

Lastly, we have also introduced a new OpenNTF project for a custom actions library.  While we have many ideas for actions currently we will immediately be opening this project up to customers and business partners for input and contribution.


Check out the new article here.

Check out the new OpenNTF project here.


If you want to learn more about actual custom action samples you can check out these other two tutorials that were posted previously:

Creating custom actions in java

Extending the Notes View container with a custom action

Create a custom container action that executes JavaScript.

Extending the Notes View Container with a “Run Agent” custom action